Why is a graduation speech called a commencement speech?

Although it means beginning, the beginning can be confused with the end because of its association with the end of studies. Its use originated when students finished their studies and obtained a degree, starting with a degree or master's degree in a subject and enjoying new privileges in the academic world.

Why is a graduation speech called a commencement speech?

Although it means beginning, the beginning can be confused with the end because of its association with the end of studies. Its use originated when students finished their studies and obtained a degree, starting with a degree or master's degree in a subject and enjoying new privileges in the academic world. Why is graduation called “graduation”? The word reflects the meaning of the Latin inceptio, a “beginning”, and was the name that medieval European scholars gave to the initiation ceremony. The original university degree certified that the holder could instruct others in a given academic discipline.

As part of the graduation ritual, which usually included a banquet that the graduate would give as a thank you to his teachers and friends, the newly appointed academic gave his first lecture as a legitimate teacher. To begin, then, means to “start teaching”. However, over time, public speaking began to lose its place as a core skill that students were expected to acquire in college. As a result, their students' demonstrations of knowledge became a smaller part of graduation exercises.

To fill the gap, guest speakers came. While participation in university and school events remained strong, attendance at the Main Mall's graduation was affected, in part, because the emphasis on hooding doctorate maces, symbols of authority that were first used in the 13th century graduation processions in Oxford and Cambridge, is still taking place at the beginning of the University of California. In many cases, it is the last formal on-campus encounter with the university community and a crucial moment for graduates to form lifelong impressions of their alma mater. Another famous benefactor of the blessing was Eugene Lang, who promised sixth-graders from 1981 at his former Harlem elementary school that he would pay their college tuition as long as they graduated from high school.

Vanessa Shelly
Vanessa Shelly

My name is Vanessa and I am a college student at the University of Michigan. I am majoring in communications and I love to write. I am a member of the Michigan Marching Band and I love to play the trumpet. Infuriatingly humble coffee guru.

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