Is it true that university graduates may be more successful in life than non graduates?

Graduates earn an average of 66 percent more than high school graduates. College graduates, on average, earn much more than those who work only with a high school diploma.

Is it true that university graduates may be more successful in life than non graduates?

Graduates earn an average of 66 percent more than high school graduates. College graduates, on average, earn much more than those who work only with a high school diploma. In general, it's possible to succeed without going to college. After all, not all employers require degrees, and not all college graduates are employed.

However, in some cases, the absence of a college degree can hinder benefits, such as more career opportunities and higher lifetime incomes. For this reason, the economic benefits of graduating from college do not boil down to having easier access to higher-paying jobs and better health insurance benefits. To increase this gap, a study conducted by Georgetown University has shown that university graduates earn an average of one million dollars more over their lifetime than those with only a high school diploma. According to a survey, up to 94% of participating parents said they expect their children to attend college immediately after graduating from high school.

This often proves to be a financial burden for college graduates who struggle in the market or are seeking higher education to fulfill the roles they want. It turns out that college graduates not only have easier access to higher-paying jobs, but they also have better access to jobs that offer quality benefits. This paints the gap between college and high school graduates from a perspective that goes beyond wealth and luxury. For most graduates, it usually takes three to six months after graduating from college before they get a job; it may take longer for those who aren't persistent enough to get a job or whose specializations aren't as in-demand.

Despite this, there are several opportunities for high school graduates to succeed, so this shouldn't just be taken as a diagnosis of failure for high school graduates. The wage increase also makes it easier for college graduates to shoulder the increasing cost of insurance premiums. Since college graduates earn nearly a million more dollars over their lifetime than those with only a high school diploma, the cost of education is easily mitigated. In particular, college graduates can expect to find better-paying jobs that offer better benefits for themselves and their families.

That device you're using, the social networks you're posting on, the TV show you're watching, the music you sing, or the hamburger you eat could be courtesy of someone who didn't graduate from college. This means that college graduates disproportionately occupy the spaces at the top of the totem, leaving high school graduates and others to fill in the gaps below.

Vanessa Shelly
Vanessa Shelly

My name is Vanessa and I am a college student at the University of Michigan. I am majoring in communications and I love to write. I am a member of the Michigan Marching Band and I love to play the trumpet. Infuriatingly humble coffee guru.

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