Do employers prefer chronological or functional resumes?

Chronological curricula focus on past experience, while functional curricula prioritize future potential. When you write a chronological resume, your goal is to give the reader a structured overview of where your career path has taken you until now.

Do employers prefer chronological or functional resumes?

Chronological curricula focus on past experience, while functional curricula prioritize future potential. When you write a chronological resume, your goal is to give the reader a structured overview of where your career path has taken you until now. A chronological resume shows growth and maturity by telling the story of where it began, how it progressed, and what it is working towards. If you can, go for the chronological one, since it's everyone's favorite.

If you're changing careers and possibly have transferable skills, combine. If you have a short career or big gaps in your experience, go for the functional one. Are you applying across state lines? Check out 3 tips for sending your resume to another state. What format do you use? Do you receive interviews? If you can, go for the chronological one, since it's everyone's favorite.

The chronological curriculum doesn't work well when there are gaps or when you have changed industries frequently, as it will reveal your weaknesses. This type of resume helps you highlight what makes you best for the job while also giving the employer all the information they want. If you are a successful professional seeking a higher position in your current industry, a chronological resume can show how and where you gained your experience and familiarity with the field. In the lower half of a chronological curriculum, you include separate sections that summarize your educational background, skills, and certifications.

The functional curriculum focuses on what you can do, what your achievements are, and your core competence. If you've held a variety of jobs and are looking for an entry-level position in a new industry, a functional resume can help highlight your skills and divert the potential employer's attention away from your inconsistent work history. In this professional advice video, Sinead explains what a functional resume is, how it is formatted and when a functional resume can be used. Therefore, when deciding what type of resume to use, you should think about your current working circumstances.

A chronological versus functional resume allows recruiters to track your career more easily, so if your work history meets these requirements, it's a good indication that you should use a chronological resume format. Employers can easily see when you send a generic resume, instead of thinking about why you're qualified for that specific job. With this type of resume, you can highlight the skills you have that are relevant to the job you're applying for, as well as provide your chronological work history. This format works best for job seekers who want to emphasize their skills, but a potential employer has asked them to include their work history in their resume.

As with any type of resume, even the popular chronological resume has its advantages and disadvantages. Frequent switching from one job to another may be evident in a chronological resume, and it gives the impression of a lack of commitment, leaving a negative impression on hiring managers. Chronological resumes are most beneficial for job seekers with a structured work history and a clear career path. Sometimes, a functional resume also includes a resume or resume title at the top, which details a person's skills and achievements.

Vanessa Shelly
Vanessa Shelly

My name is Vanessa and I am a college student at the University of Michigan. I am majoring in communications and I love to write. I am a member of the Michigan Marching Band and I love to play the trumpet. Infuriatingly humble coffee guru.

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